Ice Cream Ireland

ice cream ireland

Archive for the ‘Ice Cream’ Category

Green Tea and Ginger Ice Cream

Green Tea Ice Cream A reader of this blog emailed me asking for a green tea ice cream recipe, so here it is! It’s a recipe that will be in the upcoming book, and it’s one I love.

In New York, where I grew up, Asian food was part of the staple diet. Whether Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, or Korean, the standard was high and the variety amazing. Some of the best meals I have ever eaten were Asian cooking, and my dessert of choice, when available, was green tea ice cream.

Green TeaHere in Ireland, I have also come across green tea ice cream in some of the ever-proliferating Asian restaurants, so perhaps you have tried it as well. If so, just be aware that since we don’t believe in food colouring, we use green tea leaves (see photo right) and not the matcha (green tea powder) that is usually used for ice cream. This means that it will not be bright green and will have a slightly different taste, but I think it’s even more delicious.

For this recipe, I like to add crystallised ginger, a real favourite of mine. I love the spicy sweetness and intriguing consistency of the ginger, and since it’s coated in sugar it stays soft in the ice cream.

Murphys Green Tea and Ginger Ice Cream

Ingredients:

  • 130g sugar
    5 egg yolks
    240 ml cream
    250 ml milk
    2 tablespoon green tea leaves (4 bags)
    60 g crystallised ginger
    1 tablespoon honey

What to do:

  1. Heat the milk to a low simmer over medium heat.
  2. Add the tea and honey and maintain at a simmer over low heat for about 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat and remove the tea bags.
  4. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  5. Beat the milky tea into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  6. Pour the mixture back into the pan and place over low heat.
  7. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly (around 65-70C) and just coats the back of a spoon. Don’t over-heat, though, because at around 76C you will scramble the eggs!
  8. Immediately remove from the heat.
  9. Transfer the custard into a small container, cover, and refrigerate until cool (5C).
  10. Chopped GingerChop the crystallised ginger into small pieces.
  11. Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume (you should have soft peaks – don’t over-whip).
  12. Fold the cream (gently stir) into the custard.
  13. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, or cover and place in the freezer, stirring every few hours to break up the ice crystals.
  14. Add the ginger once the ice cream has become semi-solid.
  15. If you’re using a domestic ice cream machine, transfer to a freezer-proof covered container when the ice cream has achieved a semi-solid consistency (around 15 minutes). Place it in the freezer, and continue to freeze until it is solid.

Yield: 8 servings

Note:

To pasteurise the eggs, heat the custard to 73C and maintain that temperature for at least 5 minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, though, and keep stirring! If the custard goes any higher than 76C, the eggs will scramble. Immediately cover and place in the freezer until cool.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

Orange Jaffa (Oráiste) Ice Cream

Orange Jaffa Ice Cream This was one of our very first ice cream formulations and has proven very popular of the the years. In fact, there is a certain little girl whose first word was reportedly “Jaffa” when demanding this flavour from her parents. It’s a crowd-pleaser, with shredded bits of Jaffa cakes as well as another British invention – marmalade.

Marmalade goes way back (the Oxford English Dictionary cites 1480 as the first usage of the word) and is generally made with citrus fruits – orange being the most popular option. As citrus fruits became more available in Britain in the 16th century, marmalade became a choice sweet. In fact, anyone who has travelled in the UK will be hard put upon to remember a traditional breakfast without the option of these preserves and toast.

We like to use the marmalade as a base flavour and freshen it with orange zest. The great thing about orange zest (besides its magnificent taste) is that it uses a part of the fruit one would normally just throw away or compost, and that always is a pleasure.

ORANGE JAFFA (ORÁISTE) ICE CREAM

Ingredients:

  • Jaffa Cakes130g sugar
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 240 ml cream
  • 200 ml milk
  • Zest (grated peel) of half an orange
  • 50 g marmalade
  • 4 Jaffa cakes

What to do:

  1. Add the orange zest to the milk and bring to a simmer.
  2. Remove from the heat.
  3. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  4. Beat the milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  5. Pour the mixture back into the pan, and place over low heat.
  6. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly (around 65-70C) and just coats the back of a spoon. Don’t over-heat, though, because at around 76C you will scramble the eggs!
  7. Immediately remove from the heat. Sieve if you want to remove the orange zest.
  8. Stir in the marmalade.
  9. Transfer the custard into a small container, cover, and refrigerate until cool (5C).
  10. Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume (you should have soft peaks – don’t over-whip).
  11. Fold the cream (gently stir) into the custard.
  12. Shred the jaffa cakes into small pieces.
  13. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, adding the jaffa cakes when it’s semi-solid. You can also just cover and place in the freezer, stirring every few hours, and again, add the jaffa cakes when it’s semi-solid.
  14. If you’re using a domestic ice cream machine, transfer to a freezer-proof covered container when the ice cream has achieved a semi-solid consistency (around 15 minutes). Place it in the freezer, and continue to freeze until it is solid.

Note: To pasteurise the eggs, heat the custard to 73C and maintain that temperature for at least 5 minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, though! If the custard goes any higher than 76C, the eggs will scramble. Immediately cover and place in the freezer until cool.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

Banana Ice Cream with Chocolate Shavings

Banana Ice Cream Here in Kerry, there are some fruits that are hard to get in the depth of Winter, but you can always find bananas. They might not always be ripe, and most of the time I will pass them by when in the supermarket, discouraged at the green peel. For, as bananas ripen, the starches turn to sugar, and once they do so, this sweet, complex, rich, and velvety fruit can boost energy and give any occasion a lift, especially when it’s in ice cream.

BananaCustomers in our shops often taste our banana ice cream and say, accusingly, “This tastes like real banana!” Yes, indeed. If the only banana ice cream you have ever eaten was bright yellow and tasted only of flavouring, you will be surprised by the decadence of this recipe. Needless to say, there’s no food colouring (and why would there be? Not only do we never touch the stuff, but yellow banana ice cream doesn’t even make sense. Banana peels are yellow, not the fruit!)

All fruits in ice cream should be ripe, and with bananas there is hardly such a thing as too ripe. If you have bananas left over with brown spots on the skin, perhaps ones that the kids wont touch or that even strike you as too soft, then they are perfect for ice cream. We have used bananas when the skin had turned completely brown, and the result was delicious. Bananas, oddly enough, ripen best off the vine, and if all you can find are greenish bananas, please wait to make this ice cream and let them ripen.

I have added some chocolate shavings because I love the bitter bite of dark chocolate with banana.

MURPHYS BANANA ICE CREAM WITH CHOCOLATE SHAVINGS

Ingredients:

  • 130g sugar
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 240 ml cream
  • 200 ml milk
  • 15 ml (1 tablespoon) fresh lemon juice
  • 3 ripe bananas
  • 20 g good quality, dark chocolate

What to do:

  1. Combine the bananas with the lemon juice and blend or mash until smooth.
  2. Place in a small saucepan, add 30 g (two tablespoons) sugar, and cook over low heat, stirring all the time.
  3. Don’t over-cook. Once it has warmed, it should release a strong banana aroma, and that’s enough!
  4. Beat the rest of the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  5. Bring the milk to a low simmer in a small saucepan. Remove from the heat.
  6. Beat the milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  7. Pour the mixture back into the pan and place over low heat.
  8. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly (around 65-70C) and just coats the back of a spoon. Don’t over-heat, though, because at around 76C you will scramble the eggs!
  9. Immediately remove from the heat.
  10. Mix in the bananas.
  11. Transfer the custard into a small container, cover, and refrigerate until cool (5C). 12. Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume (you should have soft peaks – don’t over-whip).
  12. Fold the cream (gently stir) into the custard.
  13. Banana Ice Cream Close-upFreeze using a domestic ice cream machine until it has a semi-solid consistency, or cover and place in the freezer, stirring occasionally to break up the ice crystals.
  14. Use a vegetable peeler to create the chocolate shavings, and add them to the ice cream once it is reasonably solid, or they will all sink to the bottom.
  15. If you’re using a domestic ice cream machine, transfer to a freezer-proof covered container when the ice cream has achieved a semi-solid consistency (around 15 minutes). Place it in the freezer, and continue to freeze until it is solid.

Yield: 8 servings

Notes:

  1. Of course, you don’t have to add chocolate shavings if it’s not to your taste.
  2. To pasteurise the eggs, heat the custard to 73C and maintain that temperature for at least 5 minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, and keep stirring! If the custard goes any higher than 76C, the eggs will scramble. Immediately cover and place in the freezer until cool.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

Chocolate Whiskey Ice Cream

Chocolate Whiskey Ice Cream There seems to be some disagreement as to whether the Irish or the Scots invented whiskey, although the first written account (in 1405) is Irish – a monk happily distilling away. It’s very likely that whiskey pre-dates this record, and there are even some who say that none other than St. Patrick brought the method of distilling when he arrived on this island.

We’re happy to claim it, and there are few better uses than with chocolate. The earthy flavour and alcoholic tang of a strong whiskey add a great deal to chocolate, whether it be in truffles, in a sauce or in ice cream. We call this flavour “Fuisce.”

I think it is especially great at this time of year, when the weather is cold and the body craves comfort. This is my brother’s favourite flavour, and I do hope you enjoy it as well, especially over the holidays.

Ingredients:

  • 100 g sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 220 ml milk
  • 200 ml cream
  • 150 g dark (70%) chocolate
  • 45 ml (3 tablespoons) whiskey (we use Paddy because it has a strong flavour)

What to do:

  1. Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over simmering water or a in a microwave. Take care – chocolate melts at a low temperature (ca. 37C) and it burns easily, so once it’s melted, remove from the heat!
  2. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until pale yellow.
  3. Bring the milk to a low simmer.
  4. Remove from the heat and beat the milk into the egg and sugar mixture in a slow stream. Pour the mixture back into the pan and place over low heat.
  5. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly (around 65-70C) and just coats the back of a spoon. Don’t over-heat, though, because at around 76C you will scramble the eggs! Immediately remove from the heat.
  6. Add to the melted chocolate in small parts and mix thoroughly until smooth and velvety.
  7. Cover the chocolate custard with plastic wrap and refrigerate until cool.
  8. Whiskey with ice creamStir in the whiskey.
  9. Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume (you should have soft peaks – don’t over-whip).
  10. Fold the cream (gently stir) into the custard.
  11. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, or cover and place in the freezer, stirring every few hours to break up the ice crystals.
  12. If you’re using a domestic ice cream machine, transfer to a freezer-proof covered container when the ice cream has achieved a semi-solid consistency (around 15 minutes). Place it in the freezer, and continue to freeze until it is solid.

Yield: 8 servings.

Notes:

  1. The chocolate and the custard must both be warm when you mix them, or you wont get a good emulsion. It’s also important to add the custard to the chocolate in small parts, incorporating it each time by stirring.
  2. To pasteurise the eggs, heat the custard to 73C and maintain that temperature for at least 5 minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, though! If the custard goes any higher than 76C, the eggs will scramble. Immediately cover and place in the freezer until cool.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

Honeycomb Ice Cream

Honeycomb ice cream O.K. I’ve already given you the recipe for making honeycomb pieces. Now here’s one for the ice cream! It’s a bit complicated, but if you’re feeling up for the task, please go ahead and test it as part of my ice cream party!

Over the years, this has been our best-selling ice cream in the shop, and I hope it makes you as happy as the thousands upon thousands who have enjoyed it in Dingle and Killarney!

MURPHYS HONEYCOMB ICE CREAM

Ingredients:

What to do:

  1. Honeycomb ice cream coneMake the honeycomb pieces, and break then into small pieces. You will need 200ml volume, more or less (depending on your tastes!)
  2. Make the caramel sauce.
  3. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  4. Bring the milk to a simmer.
  5. Beat the milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  6. Pour the mixture back into pan, and place over low heat.
  7. Stir until the custard thickens (around 60C).
  8. Allow the custard to cool.
  9. Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume (don’t over-whip!) and fold into the custard.
  10. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, adding the honeycomb pieces and caramel sauce when it’s fairly solid.
  11. You can also just cover and place in the freezer, stirring every few hours, and again, add the honeycomb and caramel when it’s reasonably solid.

Notes:

  1. Beware adding any more caramel sauce or the ice cream will get soggy.
  2. The part about adding the honeycomb at the end is important, as you don’t want the pieces melting in the ice cream.
  3. You will have extra caramel sauce left over, and you can always use it as a topping for the ice cream or to make a caramel sundae.

Technorati tags: , , , , ,

Cookies Ice Cream

Cookies Ice Cream Here’s one of our favourite flavours that’s delighted people in our shops over the last 7 years. We use Oreos, but honestly, it could work well with any cookies that you like!

If you want to try making it, look at my last post

MURPHYS COOKIES ICE CREAM

Stack of cookiesIngredients:

  • 130g Sugar
  • 5 Egg Yolks
  • 220ml Cream
  • 200ml Milk
  • 1/4 Vanilla Bean
  • 4 Cookies

What to do:

  1. Cut the vanilla bean lengthwise and put in a saucepan with the milk.
  2. Bring the milk to a simmer.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  5. Remove the vanilla bean from the milk.
  6. Beat the milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  7. Pour the mixture back into pan, and place over low heat.
  8. Stir until the custard thickens (around 60C).
  9. Allow the custard to cool.
  10. Cookies Ice Cream on a spoonWhip the cream until it has doubled in volume (don’t over-whip!) and fold into the custard.
  11. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, adding the cookies when it’s fairly solid.
  12. You can also just cover and place in the freezer, stirring every few hours, and again, add the cookies when it’s reasonably solid.

Notes:

1. The reason not to add the cookies to early, is that they can turn the ice cream an awful grey colour if they are mixed in too early!

2. The vanilla is optional, but we like a base flavour of vanilla for this ice cream…

Technorati tags: , , ,

Cinnamon Ice Cream

Cinnamon Ice Cream Cinnamon ice cream is a great flavour as we come into winter. It’s a warming spice that counteracts the cold. This ice cream also complements so many desserts. Try it on a warm apple pie!

MURPHYS CINNAMON ICE CREAM

Ingredients:

  • Cinnamon Sticks130g Sugar
  • 5 Egg Yolks
  • 220ml Cream
  • 200ml Milk
  • 1 Cinnamon Stick (see note below)

What to do:

  1. Put the cinnamon stick in a saucepan with the milk.
  2. Bring the milk to a simmer.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  5. Remove the cinnamon stick from the milk.
  6. Beat the milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream.
  7. Pour the mixture back into pan, and place over low heat.
  8. If you want a strong cinnamon flavour, add the cinnamon stick back in.
  9. Stir until the custard thickens (around 60C).
  10. Remove the cinnamon stick.
  11. Allow the custard to cool.
  12. Whip the cream and fold into the custard.
  13. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, or cover and place in the freezer.

Notes:

1. You can substitute 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon for the stick. If you do so, mix it into the sugar before beating in the eggs.

2. You can re-use the cinnamon stick, but make sure you rinse it carefully and let it dry!

Technorati tags: , , ,

Brown Bread Ice Cream

Brown Bread Ice Cream Here’s the ice cream recipe that Sean and I presented at the cooking demonstration during the food festival. We also made the chocolate whiskey sauce to go with it.

I know I have already posted a Brown Bread and Guinness ice cream recipe, but this has a new improved method for caramalising the brown bread – i.e. simply melting the brown sugar and adding the bread crumbs. It’s so much easier and tastes just as good!!!

BROWN BREAD ICE CREAM

Ingredients:

  • 130g sugar
  • 4 Egg yolks
  • 220ml cream
  • 200ml milk
  • 1/3 vanilla bean
  • 250ml volume stale brown bread crumbs
  • 75g dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon water

What to do:

  1. Cut the vanilla bean lengthwise and put in a saucepan with the milk.
  2. Bring the milk to a simmer. Remove from the heat.
  3. Stir for about a minute. Remove the vanilla bean.
  4. Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until thick and pale yellow.
  5. Beat the warm milk into the eggs and sugar in a slow stream (don’t over mix).
  6. Pour the mixture back into pan, and place over low heat.
  7. Brown Bread Ice Cream CloseStir until the custard thickens (around 60C).
  8. Allow the custard to cool.
  9. Stir in the cream.
  10. Melt brown sugar and water in a saucepan over medium heat until the sugar crystals have dissolved.
  11. Stir in the bread crumbs and allow to cool.
  12. Freeze the mix using a domestic ice cream machine, or cover and place in the freezer.
  13. Add the brown bread once the ice cream is thick.

Notes: 1. Use a very dark brown bread for best results. 2. If it is a fresh loaf, you can crush it into crumbs, spread it on a baking tray, and bake it at low temperature (50C) for a couple of hours to dry it out. 3. A fast way to make (small) bread crumbs is to use a blender or food processor.

Technorati tags: , , ,

Author

Kieran Murphy is a director of Murphys Ice Cream living in Dingle, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

Please ask if you wish to use text or images. Copyright (c) 2006-2013.

Contact: {Send an email}

Company

Murphys Ice Cream

Murphys Ice Cream has shops in Dingle, Killarney and Dublin 2 (Wicklow Street).

You are currently browsing the archives for the Ice Cream category.