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Single Estate Chocolate Ice Cream

Chocolate scoop

I have formed a dangerous addiction to the single estate Valrhona bars, and I really do think that it doesn’t get any better in terms of pure eating chocolate. Since that’s the case, and since we’ve been talking about doing super-super-premium ice cream flavours for our shops, we decided to make single estate chocolate ice cream. (There’s a bit on us on the cover of today’s Sunday Times business section this subject).

Valrhona Grand CruGiven the expense of the chocolate, we have to charge a euro extra per scoop. I tried two out of the three single estates – Ampamakia, my favourite for eating, and Palmira. The latter is definitely better in the ice cream, but both are good.

As with many of the finer things, it’s the subtlety and complexity of flavour that makes it special. If you can find the bars and want to go wild and treat yourself, here’s a recipe!

Murphys Single Estate Chocolate Ice Cream

1 Cup (237 ml) Sugar
5 Egg Yolks
1 1/8 Cup (266 ml) Milk
1 1/8 Cup (266 ml) Cream
7 oz (200 gm) Valrhona Single Estate Chocolate
1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Yield: 6 Servings 

What to do: 

1. Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over simmering water or a microwave. Take care – chocolate burns easily!

2. Beat sugar and egg yolks together until pale yellow.

3. Bring the milk to a simmer.

4. Remove from the heat and beat the milk into the egg and sugar mixture in a slow stream. Pour the mixture back into pan and place over low heat.  Stir until the custard thickens (around 60C). 

5. Add to the melted chocolate in small parts and mix thoroughly until smooth and velvety.

6. Allow the chocolate custard to cool.

7. Stir in the vanilla.

8. Whip the cream and fold into the mix.

8. Freeze using a domestic ice cream machine, or cover and place in the freezer.

6 Servings.

Notes:

1. The boiler or container in which you melt the chocolate must be completely dry or the chocolate can clump.

2. The chocolate and the custard should both be hot when you mix them.

3. To pasteurise the eggs, heat the custard to 73C and keep at that temperature for three minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, though! If the custard goes any higher than 76C, the eggs will scramble. Immediately cover and place in the freezer until cool.

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5 Responses to “Single Estate Chocolate Ice Cream”

  1. June 5th, 2006 at 12:19 am

    Ivonne says:

    I can understand why you would be addicted to such a superior product.

    Well done!

  2. July 19th, 2006 at 2:52 am

    AZK says:

    This was just what I was looking for! thanks!

    It’s been more than 20 years since I took a summer to walk through Ireland, and I have to say, it sounds like the quality of the food has really improved!

    Thanks!

    AZK

  3. March 25th, 2007 at 10:32 pm

    Robert says:

    For those of us that can’t get Valharona bars (not where I live in the U.S.), could you give some suggestions as to the kind of chocolate we could look for to make some good chocolate ice cream using this method? (Not necessarily specific brands, but rather what qualities the chocolate should have.)

  4. March 26th, 2007 at 11:23 am

    Kieran says:

    Use any good chocolate that you can find with a high cocoa content (around 70% will work best).

  5. May 24th, 2007 at 11:39 pm

    Jeffrey says:

    I live in the U.S. and I order Valrhona chocolate through http://www.chocosphere.com. I’m not sure if they sell Single Estate but you can get baking chocolate and more there.

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Author

Kieran Murphy is a director of Murphys Ice Cream living in Dingle, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

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Company

Murphys Ice Cream

Murphys Ice Cream has shops in Dingle, Killarney and Dublin 2 (Wicklow Street).